Studio 66 : The Beginning

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About Studio 66 the Beginning

What Borromini is trying to do here is to blend two completely different shapes. Out here, there’s a kind of blunt Greek cross. A Greek cross with the ends taken off. But in the middle, all that becomes a perfect oval. So, this is the edge of the church. All this seemingly chaotic going in and out. But underlying it, as you can see, is this perfect bit of geometry.

Made up of rectangles, made up of triangles, and these circles, here. And that’s what Borromini always does. He builds this exact mathematical basis and then, he just ruffles it up like someone messing up your hair.

I’ve seen geometry as madly busy as that on the great domes of Islam, but never in a Christian Church. Borromini supplied Baroque architecture with something dark and emotional. Its feminine principle. Its yin. But every yin, of course, needs yang. And in Baroque Rome, the undisputed King of Yang was Gian Lorenzo Bernini.

The great Bernini was everything that Borromini wasn’t. Handsome, rich, haughty, a smooth operator who charmed the Kings and the Popes. As an architect, as a sculptor, a painter, the man could do everything. And the raw spirit of the Baroque coursed through his veins as fiercely as the water spouting from one of his fountains.

Studio 66 : The appearance

Where Borromini was almost certainly homosexual, and he died this terrible death, he committed suicide, threw himself on his sword and took a long time to die, Bernini was a ladies’ man through and through And Bernini would never have dreamt of killing himself because that would have deprived the world of his flamboyant genius.

It’s just a couple of hundred feet up the road from Borromini’s San Carlo, but it seems to come from a different architectural planet. Borromini invented the curved church facade that bends the front of the church out into the street. But Bernini, he got really good at it, too. That’s the Baroque for you. It twists this way and that. Always on the move, like a restless dragonfly.

Walking into Bernini’s Sant’ Andrea is like walking into a piece of theatre. Bernini fills his church with a rich colour. Look at that lantern up there, that golden lantern. He put the yellow glass up there so that when the sun shines, It’s as if the whole interior is being flooded with this gorgeous, golden, divine light. Bernini’s Church has this very specific storyline for you to notice and follow. So, St. Andrew, the patron of the church, is being martyred here. He’s heading up towards heaven there, and right at the very top, in the lantern, he’s being welcomed into heaven.

The little cherubs are even standing aside to make room for him, so he can go up there. It’s a very theatrical effect. Very different for anything Borromini ever tried to do. The Baroque had a taste for theatricality, that’s why it liked Bernini so much And if you want to witness some truly stupendous Baroque theatre, then follow me into St. Peter’s.

That extraordinary creation in front of us is Bernini’s Baldacchino, put up under the transept between 1624  and 1633. Now you have a good look at it you tell me, is that sculpture or is it architecture? or is it a combination of the two, so it doesn’t really matter? I go for the last option.

That’s what you get with the Baroque. All the dividing lines get blurred. The Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria Della Vittoria, which many people consider to be Bernini’s masterpiece, including Bernini.

It shows the Spanish saint, St. Teresa of Avila at a moment when she’s having a vision. An angel has come down to her from heaven and he’s piercing her heart with a flaming arrow.

“So real was the pain to me, that I moaned out loud several times.

“And yet, it was so indescribably sweet, that I could not wish to be released from it.

“When the angel withdrew his spear, I was left with a great love of God”.

What he’s done here is create a kind of theatre in the church. On either side, sitting in these boxes is the family that commissioned the Cornaro Chapel, the Cornaro family. Up there on the right, with a little beard, looks a little bit like Shakespeare, that’s Federico Cornaro. He’s the one who actually paid for it all. The Cornaro family has gathered to witness this miraculous event at the centre.

The other thing that people always pick up on about this work is this look on St. Teresa’s face. This open-mouthed, moaning look. Now, what Bernini is trying to do here is to find some sculptural form for this religious ecstasy that she’s feeling. But the 20th century, in particular, has misinterpreted that look on her face. All sorts of smutty remarks have been made about her ecstasy What kind of ecstasy is it? I really disagree with all of that. Imagine trying to find a sculptural form for something as difficult being overpowered by the love of God.

How do you convey that? What do you show? Well, I’ll tell you the answer. That’s what you do. This is art dazzling you with miracles. In Bernini’s hands, stone comes alive and stops behaving like stone. He could turn rock into flesh, women into trees. His work is filled with movement and restless transformation.

The Cornaro Chapel is a fusion of sculpture, painting, marbling, gilding, even the real light of God has been roped into achieving this great Baroque effect. If you’re investigating the Baroque, this is a position I recommend. Because from here, you can see the baroque properly.

The Baroque loved painted ceilings. Filling the air above you and around you with remarkable sights was a very Baroque ambition. Of course, painted ceilings had existed in Italian art for centuries. The Sistine Chapel was just the best-known example. But they’re difficult to do.

About studio 66 the Beginning
What Borromini is trying to do here is to blend two completely different shapes. Out here, there’s a kind of blunt Greek cross. A Greek cross with the ends taken off. But in the middle, all that becomes a perfect oval. So, this is the edge of the church. All this seemingly chaotic going in and out. But underlying it, as you can see, is this perfect bit of geometry.
Made up of rectangles, made up of triangles, and these circles, here. And that’s what Borromini always does. He builds this exact mathematical basis and then, he just ruffles it up like someone messing up your hair.
I’ve seen geometry as madly busy as that on the great domes of Islam, but never in a Christian Church. Borromini supplied Studio 66 architecture with something dark and emotional. Its feminine principle. Its yin. But every yin, of course, needs yang. And in Studio 66 Rome, the undisputed King of Yang was Gian Lorenzo Bernini.
The great Bernini was everything that Borromini wasn’t. Handsome, rich, haughty, a smooth operator who charmed the Kings and the Popes. As an architect, as a sculptor, a painter, the man could do everything. And the raw spirit of the Studio 66 coursed through his veins as fiercely as the water spouting from one of his fountains.
Studio 66 : The appearance
Where Borromini was almost certainly homosexual, and he died this terrible death, he committed suicide, threw himself on his sword and took a long time to die, Bernini was a ladies’ man through and through And Bernini would never have dreamt of killing himself because that would have deprived the world of his flamboyant genius.
It’s just a couple of hundred feet up the road from Borromini’s San Carlo, but it seems to come from a different architectural planet. Borromini invented the curved church facade that bends the front of the church out into the street. But Bernini, he got really good at it, too. That’s Studio 66 for you. It twists this way and that. Always on the move, like a restless dragonfly.
Walking into Bernini’s Sant’ Andrea is like walking into a piece of theatre. Bernini fills his church with a rich colour. Look at that lantern up there, that golden lantern. He put the yellow glass up there so that when the sun shines, It’s as if the whole interior is being flooded with this gorgeous, golden, divine light. Bernini’s Church has this very specific storyline for you to notice and follow. So, St. Andrew, the patron of the church, is being martyred here. He’s heading up towards heaven there, and right at the very top, in the lantern, he’s being welcomed into heaven.
The little cherubs are even standing aside to make room for him, so he can go up there. It’s a very theatrical effect. Very different for anything Borromini ever tried to do. The Studio 66 had a taste for theatricality, that’s why it liked Bernini so much And if you want to witness some truly stupendous Studio 66 theatre, then follow me into St. Peter’s.
That extraordinary creation in front of us is Bernini’s Baldacchino, put up under the transept between 1624 and 1633. Now you have a good look at it you tell me, is that sculpture or is it architecture? or is it a combination of the two, so it doesn’t really matter? I go for the last option.
That’s what you get with the Studio 66. All the dividing lines get blurred. The Cornaro Chapel, Santa Maria Della Vittoria, which many people consider to be Bernini’s masterpiece, including Bernini.
It shows the Spanish saint, St. Teresa of Avila at a moment when she’s having a vision. An angel has come down to her from heaven and he’s piercing her heart with a flaming arrow.
“So real was the pain to me, that I moaned out loud several times.
“And yet, it was so indescribably sweet, that I could not wish to be released from it.
“When the angel withdrew his spear, I was left with a great love of God”.
What he’s done here is create a kind of theatre in the church. On either side, sitting in these boxes is the family that commissioned the Cornaro Chapel, the Cornaro family. Up there on the right, with a little beard, looks a little bit like Shakespeare, that’s Federico Cornaro. He’s the one who actually paid for it all. The Cornaro family has gathered to witness this miraculous event at the centre.
The other thing that people always pick up on about this work is this look on St. Teresa’s face. This open-mouthed, moaning look. Now, what Bernini is trying to do here is to find some sculptural form for this religious ecstasy that she’s feeling. But the 20th century, in particular, has misinterpreted that look on her face. All sorts of smutty remarks have been made about her ecstasy What kind of ecstasy is it? I really disagree with all of that. Imagine trying to find a sculptural form for something as difficult being overpowered by the love of God.
How do you convey that? What do you show? Well, I’ll tell you the answer. That’s what you do. This is art dazzling you with miracles. In Bernini’s hands, stone comes alive and stops behaving like stone. He could turn rock into flesh, women into trees. His work is filled with movement and restless transformation.
The Cornaro Chapel is a fusion of sculpture, painting, marbling, gilding, even the real light of God has been roped into achieving this great Studio 66 effect. If you’re investigating the Studio 66, this is a position I recommend. Because from here, you can see the Studio 66 properly.
The Studio 66 loved painted ceilings. Filling the air above you and around you with remarkable sights was a very Studio 66 ambition. Of course, painted ceilings had existed in Italian art for centuries. The Sistine Chapel was just the best-known example. But they’re difficult to do.

The Baroque loved painted ceilings. Filling the air above you and around you with remarkable sights was a very Baroque ambition. Of course, painted ceilings had existed in Italian art for centuries. The Sistine Chapel was just the best-known example. But they’re difficult to do.

Related Posts:

Studio 66 | How it Progressed and became a masterpiece

Studio 66 : A documentary on art History

Studio 66: Watch Online for Free

Studio 66: The End of a Great Era

2 Replies to “Studio 66 : The Beginning”

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